• 2018 May 31

    Jan De Nul shows how they create extra housing and living space in the second smallest country in the world – Monaco.

    Jan De Nul shows how they create extra housing and living space in the second smallest country in the world – Monaco.

    The project consists of three stages: dredging, rock installation and land reclamation.
    During the dredging stage, which lasted from April to November 2017, the Envisan centre in Toulon played an important role as it had to process all polluted sediments.
    Project manager, Tom Van Slambrouck, said: “In a first phase, we removed an upper layer of 60,000 m³ (about 100,000 tonnes) of polluted sediments. Obviously, the fact that we could immediately process these sediments in our specialized Envisan soil treatment center nearby was a bonus to the client. We also removed 30,000 tonnes of the existing shore protection, 120,000 m³ of remblai anthropique(construction waste dumped at sea) and 400,000 m³ of ordinary sediments.” 
    The second stage of the project started in December 2017.
    The final goal is to install 1,600,000 tonnes of rock, which will serve as foundation for the dyke around the actual land expansion.
    “These rocks are loaded onto our fallpipe vessel Simon Stevin in the port of Fos, near Marseille, in batches of 30,000 tonnes. With these rocks, the Simon Stevin builds the foundation very accurately. When all material is in place, our client, Bouygues Travaux Publics, installs a belt of caissons or huge concrete blocks on top of it, behind where the new plot of land will be created,” added Van Slambrouck.